Tag Archives: computers

Swearing Off

Over the years, I have sworn off various things. Actually, it was more of a worn off than sworn off. Television programs lost quality, although there was a vast increase in quantity thanks(?) to cable. Too many choices, not have enough time to actually follow a series, so now it’s the occasional Netflix.

I do watch the morning news for the weather forecast and traffic report. Unfortunately it seems to be 80 percent commercials, so I have to pay strict attention while shaving or else I miss it.

I used to love computers, which led to a fascination with the internet. Most of what is available online is best left alone. Let’s just say that it’s a bit worse than a naked stroll through a tick infested patch of poison ivy complete with brown recluse spiders and venomous snakes. I admit that I deny reality and look for decent content. Unfortunately, the best I find are things like YouTube videos showing me how to adjust the carburetor on my weed eater.

So, what does that leave? Reading, writing, experimenting, ham radio, guitar, drums, or puttering around the house.

All things considered, much better choices.

Trying Something Different

 

linuxWe’re on a little trip, with a few changes from the norm. First, we’re using the train for transportation, which we’ve done several times, and after that, either walking or the Metro. Since it’s already a variation on my usual theme, I am not using my regular notebook computer, but instead a vintage 2008 hand-me-up netbook computer. Netbooks are generally about half the size (or less) of a standard laptop/notebook computer and have smaller memory and disk capability. While the modest hardware is designed to support a user who relies on the Internet instead of the computer itself, by using Linux as the operating system (OS) you can pack a lot of capability into a very small package.

Linux, in case you don’t know is an open-source operating system—meaning that developers can modify it to meet their needs, within certain parameters. More significantly, that also means that it is free. LINUX is a rewrite of UNIX, a very powerful—but very expensive commercial operating system. UNIX was written by computer nerds for computer nerds; LINUX, perhaps more so, since its development is shared among many developers. Many of the systems that you may connect with via the Internet probably operate using Linux, yet your Windows based computer is able to interact seamlessly.

This version of LINUX—Ubuntu—has a graphical user interface similar to Windows with similar functions; LibreOffice offers includes a word processor, spreadsheet, etc., all of which are also free. To utilize its most powerful features, however, you use the command line method—kind of like the old Microsoft DOS.

The reason I took this computer is to encourage me to learn more about the more powerful features of Linux by working with the command line. Linux seems to be popping up more often, especially among geek toys and systems. The Raspberry Pi microcomputer runs on Linux (although Microsoft made a Windows 10 version for it once it became so popular). However, Linux tends to be more robust, use less memory, and run faster in most cases.

In any case, so far, so good. Sunday’s blog was written on this machine, and so is today’s. We’ve been too busy having fun for me to devote myself to learning command line LINUX, but I’ve learned some. Having fun and learning all in the same day? Outstanding!

Geekery for Geekery’s Sake

Dated--but still a great flick

Dated–but still a great flick

We all know that computer geeks love to speak among themselves in terms that defy logic, and the understanding of those they consider “mere mortals.” They speak of “enterprise-wide solutions” when they install software for an entire company. If you have a computer problem, they “open a ticket.”

Okay, we get it. If you spoke in plain English, we’d not be nearly so impressed. But what’s the deal with software names? Why must you geeks choose names that give absolutely no clue as to what the software is supposed to do?

Microsoft Silverlight: Sounds like it should, I don’t know, decrease the mass of a heavy metal? [It deals with streaming media, graphics, etc.]

Avast: Sounds like a program for messaging pirates. [It’s an anti-malware program]

Magical Jellybean: Something to prepare for Easter or Halloween? [It displays the activation codes you entered when installing software.]

While “Word” sort-of, kind-of suggests a word processor, “Excel” does not scream “SPREADSHEET” to me.

CCleaner: Is an anomaly; it means “crap cleaner” as in getting rid of all those leftover pieces of programs you no longer need. But, as I said, it’s an anomaly.

So, to all you computer geeks out there, be warned that, I’m getting ready to frambus on the esperel before re-chwising the quimbrel.

So, there!

WWW 25 Years

Google tells me that the web is 25 years old, today. Wow!

What I learned computing on, and YES! I did own one.

What I learned computing on, and YES! I did own one.

I remember somewhere in the early ’90’s connecting via phone to “Freenet,” which was an early link to the internet through Cleveland State University. They had less than 100 lines – for a metropolitan area of several million people. Yes – you did get busy signals from time to time, but there weren’t that many people interested in connecting.

Quite a difference today. We now take connectivity for granted.

So to Sir Tim Berners-Lee (gotta love “Sir Tim” as in “Some call me —– Tim” from “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”) we say well done!