Tag Archives: Jews

Who Speaks for Me?

theBible_poster_joshua_cc

The Bible
The History Channel
http://www.history.com/shows/the-bible

When we see family or tribal based societies, we have difficulty appreciating them. Many Muslim countries adhere to these relationships just as the Jews did throughout the Bible. The father, as head of the family could speak on behalf of the whole family – and the extended family. All who lived as part of his family were subject to his decisions. Joshua could, therefore, commit his entire household to serve the Lord God.

Imagine how such a commitment might play out today.

“I have committed this family to serve the Lord,” said Joshua as he walked into his suburban home outside a major American city.

“Now, Joshua,” replied his wife. “We’ve talked about you committing me to things without me agreeing to it, first. You can say whatever you want, but don’t expect me to blindly follow.”

“Dad!” replied his eldest son. “All the kids are into worshiping the Baals! I’m not going to be a social outcast, just because of you.”

“Hey, don’t look at me,” replied another child. “I’m your stepson. When I talk to my REAL dad, he’ll be honked off.”

Today the dynamics are different. In a faith centric family, the husband and wife are hopefully already on the same page. Two committed adults are stronger than one and better able to guide the family together. It’s different, in that each of us has more of a voice.

But that means each of us is called upon to commit ourself to God and his way individually as opposed to relying on someone else to commit us.

The Rocks and Stones

Tomorrow is Palm Sunday, commemorating when Christ entered Jerusalem.

palmsunday

I think his apostles had been waiting for this day, especially Simon the Zealot. Jesus the Messiah, the leader, the man who would lead the crowd to victory.

His welcome was a hero’s welcome. Palms and cloaks were laid on the path as a sign of homage and honor.

Jesus was the only one who truly understood what was happening. On the one hand He knew how important the trip to Jerusalem was for not only the Jews, but for the whole world. He knew that it was so important that if the crowd hadn’t cheered Him, the rocks and stones would have.

On the other hand, He knew that He would be beaten, abused, ridiculed and abandoned. He would face the very worst that Evil could throw at Him.

He knew that the crowd cheering Him would be replaced by a crowd calling for and then celebrating His death. He knew that the evil crowd would include many of those who cheered His arrival into Jerusalem.

But the rocks and stones didn’t turn on Him. They didn’t betray Him. They didn’t deny Him. They didn’t kill Him.

The rocks and stones remained loyal.